rstudio16

How to Install R on Linux Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

The long-awaited new Ubuntu LTS Xenial Xerus was released last week. I wrote a tutorial on installing R and R-Studio on the old 14.04 LTS, so I figured I’d update that document. Not much has changed for the new 16.04 version but there are new repositories. Install R-Base You can find R-Base in the Software Read More

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Upgrade R on Windows with the installr Package

It’s that time again—time for a new R version! The latest version 3.2.3 “Wooden Christmas Tree” is a small upgrade for most, but a huge step for Windows users. Of the new features included in Wooden, half of them are Windows-specific. Several months back I wrote a tutorial on how to upgrade R on a Read More

shiny-server-alive

Install Shiny Server for R on Ubuntu the Right Way

Is it time to spin up a new instance of Shiny Server? This tutorial is baseed on a fresh install of Ubuntu Server 14.04, but I’m sure it could be tweaked to work on RHEL or CentOS as well. There’s no real secret sauce to the install but there are several “gotcha’s” that most people Read More

rprog1432282137

How to Upgrade R Without Losing Your Packages

Yup kids, it’s that time again. The new version of R was just released. In the past I’ve hesitated to upgrade my R version because I knew I would lose all of my packages during the new install, which makes me very grumpy. I found this neat little trick to save my current packages before Read More

2318093969_1c77083865_baseball

How to install openWAR package in R-Studio on Linux and Mac

So how the heck do sabermatricians calculate Wins Above Replacement (WAR)? In recent years, WAR calculations have been the “secret sauce” of baseball statistics, with websites like Fangraphs and Baseball Reference disagreeing on how to calculate the metric. Enter openWAR In an effort to “open source” the math for WAR, this great little R package Read More

SAS_install

How to run SAS 9.4 on Ubuntu Linux 14.04 Natively

SAS in one of the longest running statistical software packages out there, so why then would they not support today’s most popular Linux distros (i.e. Debian-based systems)? Not sure what the answer is, but have found a solution! Note: This is for an Ubuntu installation. I’ve also heard of success using CentOS. Why not just Read More